Should We Listen to The Experts?

The Experts

Well, experts do have some validity. GREED is a big problem in the current economic meltdown, and all the religious founders attempted to address it.  However, here is a general question I opened up in Linkedin:

“Here’s the problem I have. I turn on a discussion on public television, with some ivory league professors, discussing the global meltdown. The University of Chicago professor might have a major disagreement with the professor from Harvard. Alan Greenspan a couple days ago, said there was a loophole in his model. The Democrats and Republicans are still fighting along traditional party lines, on what to do. So how do we fix the mess – and why – as it effects the whole world?”

I do like listening to the experts, but then I make up my own mind. I watch BBC on public TV, and they do have many subject matter experts they interview. I enjoy this, but know the experts don’t have all the answers.

A Medical Example

Let’s take medicine, for example:

  1.  Traditional medicine has a mechanical view.
  2.  Alternative medicine has a vitalism view (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Vitalism – I include many modalities there, like Reiki, acupuncture, TCM, Ayurveda, etc.)
  3. Then there is the spiritual healing view. This could include Sufi healing, Christian Science, Pentecostalism, faith healing, Native American ceremony, etc.

The problem is each group sees with a partial lenses, and they might not have access to all the variables. If a person were dying of cancer, they might approach a Native American medicine man/woman, have chemotherapy and radiation, and have access to Traditional Chinese Medicine (to neutralize the side effects of radiation and chemotherapy).

Medical Experts

Let’s get back to the question on experts. Let’s take something as simple as pulse diagnosis in medicine (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Pulse_diagnosis ). It takes years to master the oriental art, but it is highly effective, in pinpointing problem areas. Ideally you would have someone available to perform pulse diagnosis, and someone to run traditional medical tests. Then have a panel to look at both results, to determine root cause.

Let’s discuss this a bit further. Some groups look at disease as entirely mental. This would be folks’ like Christian Scientists or Hawaiian shamans called Huna practitioners. However, I have personally known Christian Science healers and someone quite effective with the Huna approach to healing.

Personal Experience

  • I personally know a case where a boy broke an arm – the doctor repaired it – but this Huna healer worked on it after it was in a cast. The next day, the boy’s parents took him back to the doctor, and another X-ray was taken. The arm was completely healed.

What Science Says

  •  Normal medical science says it takes six weeks for a broken bone to mend – not one day. And in Christian Science, they do have cases of “mental surgery.”

Homeopathy

It gets a bit more complicated, in that I have a considerable amount of expertise in homeopathic medicine. This has taken several years to accomplish. However, I can’t explain why certain remedies work. But I do know that if I give the wrong remedy – it won’t work. But if I give the right one – it works. In many cases, no molecule of the original substance exists in a remedy. Let’s look at a chemist having the same difficulty, at http://www.homeowatch.org/articles/schwarcz.html

“I have a problem with homeopathy. To accept its principles, I must cast aside the understanding of chemistry that I have developed over 30 years. Therapy based on nonexistent molecules just does not fit the model.”

Which Expert Would You Choose?

When I was a part-time academic bum, at the College of Dupage, I had courses with two very gifted Protestant professors.  Whom would you say is better suited to defend the Christian faith?

  1. A Baptist minister, with a doctorate in historical theology, from a Catholic university?
  2. A seminary graduate working on a PhD in philosophy (assume they completed the degree) ?

Medical science is a different matter.  Luke was a New Testament physician, but hung around miracle wonder workers – yet never renounced being a doctor.  There are things that exist – unknown variables – but “just does not fit the model.”  Luke can attest to that, if we believe his accounts.

What Economic Meltdown View Should We Take?

  1. Is it the view found in the “Left Behind Series” of books (see http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/The_Regime)?
  2. Or do the lines of an REM song reflect it?

“It’s the end of the world, as we know it and I feel fine.”

Hopefully, we follow the middle way of Aristotle and Buddha.

Randy Kemp

www.randykempcopywriting.com

 

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One Response

  1. I think that the medical/drug industry is one of the most corrupt industries in the world that is preventing more true advances in health, wellness and advancement because of the money associated with drugs. I think the network marketing industry has done more for health, wellness and healing than all the drug companies combined.

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