Marketing Medical Diagnosis

It sounds like rocket science – perhaps it is. Today we will look at marketing the mundane and unusual, when it comes to locating a medical root cause. Let’s be creative, shall we? We will look at marketing standard medical tests, oriental pulse diagnosis, and medical intuition.

Oriental Pulse Diagnosis Definition

Let’s begin with a simple definition, from answers.com/topic/puls…. “In older healing systems, such as Ayurveda and TCM, doctors check the pulse just as Western doctors do, but they use a very intricate system of pulse measurements, and they rely on careful observations instead of diagnostic tools. Pulse diagnosis is considered as much an art as a science, and it takes physicians many years of training to become experts. Doctors skilled in pulse diagnosis can often find health problems with a quick touch. Some published observations have documented the effectiveness of pulse diagnosis by trained experts, comparing their diagnoses with the diagnoses with modern technology.” I do have a homeopathic physician, who spent several years perfecting this method. Often his diagnosis is very accurate.

How should we market this? Perhaps we should use an historical approach. Perhaps we can show how this has been around for thousands of years, and has stood the test of time. An interesting website taking an historical approach, along with testimonies, etc., is http://www.tibetanherbs.com/.

Medical Intuitive Definition

Let’s look at a simple definition at healing.about.com/od/m…. “A medical intuitive is a psychic or intuitive counselor who specializes in perceiving information concerning the human body. Medical Intuitives can energetically see and diagnose the insides (organs, glands, blood, etc.) of our bodies” The medical intuitive brings a different approach. Is it real or is it Memorex? Recently I consulted one for a free mini health reading. They correctly pinpointed to health issues, starting several years ago. From a theological and philosophical perspective, you must address this question: is the source natural or supernatural? If supernatural, is the source good or bad?

How do we sell this? If the party worked with celebrities, then they could provide some great endorsements. What would be even better is to snag a celebrity scientist – maybe even a medical doctor. It reminds me of the X-Files slogan: “The truth is out there somewhere.”

Medical Tests Definition

Let’s look at a simple definition at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…. “A medical test is a kind of medical procedure performed to detect, diagnose, or evaluate disease, disease processes, susceptibility, and determine a course of treatment.” I have had my share of yearly checkups, where they do blood work, etc. What you need to focus on is the USP (Unique Selling Position) of the individual doctor. Do they make house calls? Have they served with some volunteer agency, such as Doctors without Borders? Do they cater to the upscale, offering Champagne and caviar? What differentiates this particular doctor from all the other medical school trained doctors?

Star Trek Tricorder

Let’s look at a simple definition at en.wikipedia.org/wiki/…. “In the fictional Star Trek universe, a Tricorder is a handheld device used for scanning an area, interpreting and displaying data from scans to the user, and recording information.” The Tricorder is an interesting one. Let’s say this pioneering medical device is legally available for the general population. I’ll take a cue from legendary copywriter and entrepreneur Joe Sugarman. He pioneered the marketing of Blue Blocker sunglasses. Rather than allowing us to see what’s going on, he uses a rather startling technique. Each participant wearing the sunglasses describes the incredible sights the glasses bring. They tell a story or paint a picture. This invokes our curiosity regarding the actual experience. Imagine the same thing happening – via the Tricorder – involving a group of amateurs, playing with these electronic gadgets, and experimenting on each other. How can we join the party?

Say Hi Michael

Let’s end with an interesting note from copywriter Michael Fortin, whom I strongly endorse his ezine, along with that of Clayton Makepeace. He did a strong article on sloppy, Internet marketing copy at michelfortin.com/blame…. Its entitled Blame the copywriter – not the copy.

Don’t Forget the PDF

If you want a good, free PDF conversion tool, look at PrimoPDF, CutePDF Writer, or DoPDF.

Randy Kemp

http://www.randykempcopywriting.com

 

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