Where have all the Twitter apps gone? FaceBook Passing!

You’re right!  The title does rhyme with the song, Where Have All The Flowers Gone by Peter, Paul and Mary (google.com/url?…).

Facebook Movie

Are you watching the movie advertisements? There’s one up and coming movie that looks good. It’s called Social Networks and it airs October 1st. We find out about the early days of FaceBook and there’s some Wiki info at en.wikipedia.or…. The newer book is available at amazon.com/gp/p…. I’m going to read this book (i.e. The Facebook Effect by David Kirkpatrick). In fact, I had my local library place a hold on it, and I picked it up this week.

Movies About Low Life Characters

I guess I love watching movies about:

  1. The rich and bored
  2. The criminally insane and masterminds

Probably the second item is from my love of Quentin Tarantino. Yet I could never figure out why the Pulp Fiction bad boys don’t use silencers, when getting rid of the college boys.

Tarantino and his fixation with bad guys, rubbed off on me. Now I’m probably the only white man watching Hood movies on BET TV (http://www.bet.com/). Or I’m the only non-historian watching Gangland on the History channel (http://www.history.com/). Tarantino! Why did you do this to me?

Twitter Applications Turned Upside Down

Enough of that! What’s happening with Twitter lately? All the Twitter apps I normally use appear upside down.

Let me explain! Twitter doesn’t like bulk unfollow and two things have happened:

  1. Some Twitter applications have stopped promoting all Twitter services.
  2. Some Twitter applications claim Twitter has stopped them from promoting Twitter services.
  3. Some Twitter applications have just changed how they have done business. An example is giving a list of followers to unfollow, but having you select them, one at a time.

Buzzom

Buzzom (http://www.buzzom.com/) was the first Twitter app I use to stop functioning. Here’s a blog entry at buzzom.com/blog…, which says in part:

“Apparently, our service has been randomly shutdown by the Twitter’s automatic monitoring system. It is not the first time that we have faced this issues. But unlike in our previous case, this time we have not been given any reasons.”

“We are still figuring out why this has been done. As you all probably know that we have changed our service a lot of time to comply with the Twitter’s changing Terms and Conditions. As a result, the present version of buzzom had nothing against the Twitter’s TOS.”

Social Oomph

It’s another great tool at socialoomph.com…. You see, I could have automatic follow, unfollow, and a direct message sent to all followers. But if I check my automatic stats, it says:

“Last checked for new followers 3 weeks, 3 days ago. At the time of this last check the account had 17,649 followers.”

Look’s like it’s broken to me.

Twitter Mutuality

At twittermutualit…, you can follow a mutual club of 20 club followers. Recently, instead of giving statistics, it just says start…and then…nothing.

In fact, the latest message is this:

HTTP Error 503. The service is unavailable.”

In case you are wondering, here’s an explanation for 503 at addedbytes.com/…:

“A 503 status code is most often seen on extremely busy servers, and it indicates that the server was unable to complete the request due to a server overload.”

Twitter Karma

The last twitter tool I’ll talk about is Twitter Karma, found at dossy.org/twitt…. They recently added this note to their site:

“On January 15, 2010, Twitter instructed us to remove the “bulk unfollow” capability of Twitter Karma as it has been determined to violate their Automation Rules and Best Practices. We have done so to comply with their request. We apologize to you, our users, for having to make this change, but hope you will understand it is outside of our control.”

Here’s my 64-dollar question: Why did Twitter Karma find this easy to carry out, yet Buzzom was having a hard time?

A personal story

Several years ago, I attended a product conference. There was a former school teacher, talking about how he sold this amazing product. He got up and drew a bunch of diagrams, showing how much money he made – it looked like a king’s ransom.

What was the product now? I think it’s canned dehydrated water – just add water.

Anyway, I’m invited back to join seminar attendees. Now I wasn’t wearing a tie. This Hispanic leader pulls out a drawer full of ties and offers me one.

After he chats a few moments, he hands out forms to fill out. The form is for sales training, where you pay a few hundred bucks.

Now I thought to myself: “Why do I need to pay several hundred bucks for sales training, on a product that’s sold on commission?”

Well, I was polite. I told the Hispanic leader I needed some time to think it over. He then pulls this dynamic act, in front of everyone. He tears up my application form and responds:

“We’re only looking for serious people.”

I smiled and politely walked out of the room. I wonder what his definite of serious was?

Now back to Twitter. Perhaps these twitter apps are getting confused on definitions? Or perhaps Twitter is getting confused on what definition is standard for all apps?

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2 Responses

  1. Hello Randy,

    Twitter does not want other organizations to make profit by using their platform! They acquired some of the popular Twitter apps and shutting down others one by one. Instead of putting restrictions on their API usage, they are simply terminating the services which they consider impacting use of Twitter web! Still there are many useful apps available, waiting for their turn.

    You can try http://tweettwain.com which has one advantage, you can use your own API key, so even if Twitter ban TweetTwain(looks like they have taken extreme care in following Twitter rules), you can continue using the app. You can follow/unfollow but there is an in-built time delay.

    Cheers,
    Ben.

    • Ben:
      Thanks for adding some insightful perspective on my Twitter App blog post. I’ll definitely check out the Twitter App URL you mentioned.
      Randy

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