A tale of 2 open source office suits and Yahoo executive resume blunders

Yahoo cube

Yahoo cube (Photo credit: dajobe)

First let me share some good articles to read from some academic friends of mine:

Yahoo resume mistake?

Let me focus your attention on a Yahoo Executive that had to step down.  It’s because he lied about his degree.

Yahoo CEO Scott Thompson Officially Steps Down [UPDATED] Yahoo resume mistake

The problem is that Scott Thompson claimed he “graduated with a degree in accounting and computer science in 1978 from Stonehill College.”  In reality, he only had an accounting degree.

But here’s my issue.  The story also says this: “Thompson, who was before the president of PayPal, became CEO of Yahoo on January 4.”  So if he was president of PayPal, that should get him a job as CEO at Yahoo.  Why continue the same degree lie, which is meaningless – when you have been in top management at another firm?

LibreOffice-3.4

LibreOffice-3.4 (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

What’s LibreOffice up to?

LibreOffice started because they didn’t like that OpenOffice was run by Oracle.  They started their own version.  But a few months ago, OpenOffice was turned over to the Apache foundation.

In last weekend’s blog post I mentioned having trouble installing Open Office (i.e. Apache version) on my HP windows computer.  I had to manually click on the setup file, after all the files expanded into temporary storage.

When I tried installing LibreOffice on my HP and Dell computers, I got an error with Dell.  It kept prompting me to close an already installed LibreOffice – no such animal.  But I was able to install it on my HP machine with no issue.

Two competing open source office products?  Why not?  I suspect the issue is the number of people and organizations provides product support.  This will keep the fire going. Let’s survey some articles from this week:

I suspect that Microsoft office development will fuel the enhancement requests on LibreOffice and OpenOffice.

Now I will keep both versions running on my HP computer.  They seem to work with the same document types.  So it should be easy to work on the same document in either office product.

I wonder if Oracle just wanted to get out of the free open source business?  Or did they find LibreOffice a threat and figured an Apache donation would be a good strategic move?

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