Checking out a business before becoming a client or taking a job

This should be obvious. Recently, I had a potential client approach me for a contact. They wanted me to provide IT training for clients. I would get a percentage and they would do the research, marketing, etc., on the audience end.

Hoover's Logo

Hoover’s Logo (Photo credit: Wikipedia)

Sounds good?

But there are a few problems when I did some research. Here’s what I found:

  • Why can’t I find the company in either Reference USA, Hoover’s or the BBB?
  • Why is the company showing up with a poor rating on the Web of Trust (i.e. WOT)?
  • Why can’t I find an active social media presence for theml. After all, everyone from small one person businesses to mufti-national corporations has one?

The spokesman answered as follows:

  • We are listed on Hoover’s as XXX. Kindly find the respective link below
  • WOT ratings are primarily based on Information from third-party sources and User reviews parameters, since it’s a new portal, it will definitely take some time for us to improve our WOT ratings.
  • We are waiting for our SEO and web analytics results to be improved and soon we will have an active social media presence.

Stop researching? No.

  •  I have access to Hoover’s online, both as a College of Dupage alumni and area resident. Yes, this company is on Hoover’s. But it has only one employee and zero percent yearly growth, according to the Hoover report. Why only one person?
  • Now if you go to Alexa and put in original company, the detailed report shows that 91.1 percent of traffic comes from India. The Hoover’s company name they gave me says 100 per cent of the traffic is from India.
  • If you look at the WOT commentary, the user feedback says, “This business is promoted by unsolicited emails advertising training courses. “
  • If you go to WhoIs, it shows both websites are being owned and registered by the same Indian person.

    The Wizard of Oz as pictured in The Wonderful ...

    The Wizard of Oz as pictured in The Wonderful Wizard of Oz by L. Frank Baum (Photo credit: Wikipedia)


I always like the Wizard of Oz analogy. A website can be like smoke and mirrors, portraying a great and powerful wizard presence. But perhaps behind the smoke and mirrors, there’s a solitary older gentleman with a microphone and parlor tricks. Not saying this applies to this soliciting client. But I like the Wizard of Oz scene.

Takeaway

If you portray yourself as a big, international corporation via websites, don’t be surprised if someone investigates your claims and status.  I might even have worked with this company, if they were truthful upfront with their manpower and start-up status

Hyundai paint codes

But they aren’t the only ones giving misleading information. I had to fix some minor damage in my Hyundai Santa Fe. I can get some bumper filler from Advanced Auto Parts. I can get the touch up paint custom made at Microfinish, which makes auto touch up paint – among other things.

But I called 3 area Hyundai dealerships to get the paint code and see if they sell the touch up paint. I was asked for my VIN number, which I gave to them. But two dealerships gave me incorrect codes.  They don’t exist for the Microfinish available codes, tailored to my vehicle year and model. They told me Hyundai no longer makes that color.  Only one dealership gave me the right code. Now are they just not informed of the correct codes or are they giving me misleading information? If the last answer – why?

Takeaway

If you ask for my VIN number (even checking with Hyundia distribution on paint availability), then you should know the paint code.  Microsinish got the available paint codes right for my model and year.  And if you gave me misleading paint codes – why?  After all, you know longer make the paint.  How can I trust you to get any part right for me?  That’s one reason I’ll stick with aftermarket parts, when I can use them (i.e. maintenance and non-warranty repairs).

Share

 

Advertisements

One Response

Comments are closed.

%d bloggers like this: